Quick Look: Interactive Displays at Walmart

The other day I was in Walmart shopping and looking at displays, and a couple interactive displays caught my eye. We work on a lot of interactive, smart home displays, and while we didn’t work on these ones we’re talking about here, I did think they were interesting. They did some things good / great, and I think there are a couple things that could amp them up.

WM interative displays

The two displays I saw, I really like. Walmart does a nice job presenting smart home products in a calm, cool and collected manner. Security is handled below with a closed case that is still inviting (lighting) that allows guests to view product boxes. There’s a nice integrated caption strip above the case and below the display for a branding message.

Above the strip, the display sit – one is a Google display and, located elsewhere in the electronics department, is a home wi-fi display. I don’t know if Walmart designed and built these displays or individual brands did, likely Walmart did as the wi-fi one showcases several brands, but they bring a cohesive look and feel. Both displays are punctuated by simple white metal forms and a large back panel graphic.

I love the simplicity and focus on the actual product. The downside is there is too much white space; I advocate all the time for simplicity (and negative space) but these two might take it a touch too far. There is some architecture and surface area on the Google display that could benefit from some product call outs (so guests can associate product with name) or high level information. Regardless, the display successfully leverages its back panel with large type that calls in guests from thirty feet away and beyond.

The wi-fi display does a great job leveraging a video monitor and sound to tell several product stories. The buttons are clearly marked, explaining to guests what they are going to be learning about. I don’t mind the reach and the videos do a nice job of explaining things, with content seemingly created for the display and just just random commercials. The back panel graphic falls down a bit by being not-so-inspiring, and inexplicably there is a large expanse to the left of the screen that could benefit from some whimsy or designedly touches to delight the guests.

Overall two nice simple displays that error on the side of being too simple. But I would rather see that than something overwrought and confusing to guests. Especially in an already confusing category.

-Chris

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Chris Weigand is president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC, a northeast Ohio based retail design consultancy that works with retailers, manufactures and brands to create engaging retail experiences. Chris has worked in retail design for over twenty years, and has worked with over 200 brands and retailers during his career. Contact Chris at 330.858.8926 for more information and to discuss your retail experience needs. 

I <3 Pet Store Signage

An impromptu stop at my local Pet Supply Plus reminded me of how much I love simple graphics. And pet stores, with their categorization by pet type is a no-brainer for fun icon driven way finding graphics. Other chains such as Petsmart and PetCo are just as adept at this. It makes shopping for pet supplies, and pets for that matter, more fun in my opinion.

In PSP they use simple one color (plus white) graphics with pet icons and simple copy such as “CAT”. In a world with overwrought design direction it’s refreshing to see something so simple make it to retail, creating a pool of calm in what would otherwise be a visually clamorous environment.

Breathe.

Ahh…

The store also had a cool community themed endcap, which presumably is customized based on each store location. DO THIS IN YOUR STORE!!! Our research shows that people want a better sense of community in their lives. This endcap is just an example. Do what is right for your store and your community…a coffee desk, amp’d up bulletin board, in-line display…inside…outside…but do something to break away from the big-box photocopy mode.

Lastly I’ll pick on all retailers for a minute. There was a neat Kurgo display that obviously someone spent a lot of great effort and money on, only to be marred by a bunch of repetitive paper call outs on the scanner plates. I don’t know what the answer is but please why do we have to do this. Maybe an extruded price strip across all the hooks and alternate between price and a “new” callout. Maybe don’t use white on the callouts, maybe black or chocolate to match in store, or blue or orange to match the brand. This is 100% just me though and my need for organization and simplicity. So don’t get too worked up over it.

The Kurgo display was pretty rad though with its subtle topographical easter egg on its shroud that keen eyes will delight in discovering. I’d love to find out how they did that (both made it and got it past the bean counters).

I love chain pet stores as a source of inspiration, especially for graphic design and way finding. Think about including them in your pool of resources for inspiration on your next brand or retail project.

And you can always pick up some food for your furry friend while you’re at it.

-Chris


Chris Weigand is a retail experience expert, lover of simple design solutions, and a cat person. His views are his own and he receives no compensation for give products, brands and retailers a shout out. Where he and his firm do get compensation is from bring awesome retail solutions to you. Contact Chris today to discuss your needs – store interior, store within a store, pop up, displays, fixtures….he and his team can help your brand create delightfully awesome retail experiences. 330-858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddesign.com

North American Int’l Auto Show Roundup

We took the opportunity to visit the 2015 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Michigan a couple of weeks ago. And I thought I’d share with you some of the things we found interesting there.

Auto shows are great venues to see the latest trends not only in-car design but also in color, textures, materials. And the cars are not the only attraction. For retail designers there are plenty of great displays and exhibits to get inspiration from.

If you can’t make it to Detroit, which is the premiere show in the U.S., visit one of the other big shows such as New York, L.A. or Chicago if you can. Otherwise find a show near you. The auto show in Cleveland is one of the largest in the country, and many of the cars and displays from the big name shows can be seen just up the road from us, here in Northeast Ohio.

Observations from Detroit:

  • hybrids and electric cards are becoming mainstream, and the design of their charging stations it unique opportunity for branding and design
  • matte paint finishes continue to trend. Volvo and Mercedes had a lot of matte cars
  • interactive kiosks were everywhere, even replacing the static info boards by the cars on display. (Also you can find them in car dealerships, by the way – was in a Jeep dealer this past weekend and they had kiosks all over)
  • the design of exhibits seemed heavy on hospitality with nice desks, benches and seating areas, including benches with tablets and headphones for listening to music
  • the Buick display stood out for its use of fine finishes and curves. Lots of curves and attention to details
  • great graphic design on display, both in exhibits and on cars
  • large video walls were prominently used. Infiniti, Scion and Chevrolet in particular. You could see through Chevy’s LED video walls.

 

Summer Trends – Fun Bright Saturated Colors

A quick post. I went “retailing” on Friday, gathering inspiration for a project we’re working on, and I just had to share a trend I was seeing at retail, and in my email “in-box”.

This Summer at retail and in homes is a bit more upbeat with the use of saturated, and in some cases day-glow, colors. We’ve had a great Summer weather wise here in NEOhio, and seeing these colors out in the marketplace only helps to punctuate a very memorable season this year.  Here are some photos I took, along with some inspiration from Houzz.com (which is a great source for inspiration, and resources to liven up your interiors and landscapes).

Hot For Summer Right Now:

Colors: orange, green, pink

Patterns: stripes, dots

Tactics: color blocking, saturation, day-glow

Punches of summer fun color pop on this wonderful illuminated fixture.

Punches of summer fun color pop on this wonderful illuminated fixture.

Natural, yet eye popping tones, hold down the other end of the bright summer color fest.

Natural, yet eye popping tones, hold down the other end of the bright summer color fest.

White interiors mean that you can amp up the fun with color and stop customers in their tracks with color blocking - cheap easy and effective. Do this more often.

White interiors mean that you can amp up the fun with color and stop customers in their tracks with color blocking – cheap easy and effective. Do this more often.

lotion-summer-display-3

Colorful product is the star.

Colorful product is the star.

stripe-green-blanket

Bright oranges are finding their time in the sun this Summer, as are dot patterns.

Bright oranges are finding their time in the sun this Summer, as are dot patterns.

Almost day-goo signage used to announce one of the many sales of the season.

Almost day-goo signage used to announce one of the many sales of the season.

Bright oranges and greens, and over the top umbrella structures (pun intended).

Bright oranges and greens, and over the top umbrella structures (pun intended).

We Love The Glove Signs At Lowe’s

It’s Spring, so that means nearly non-stop trips to Lowe’s for various and assorted supplies to complete all the projects we have back at the ranch. While there I came across this wonderful glove display near the bird food and doors leading outdoors. I just had to share it with you.

glove-sign-at-lowes

glove-display-detail-lowesThe look is super simple but highly effective. Sign panels organize the glove shopping experience by type or durability of product. It’s easy to shop because of the awesome iconography, color and plenty of visual negative space. Looking closely you notice the icons are die cut from 1/4′ board – presumably Sintra PVC. In this case it’s a good use of materials, assuming the display stays up year round and doesn’t wind up in a landfill. The natural shadowing and stand-off icons liven up the display. It looks upscale yet right on brand. Were Lowe’s to follow this visual brand language throughout the store they would definitely elevate their retail experience and separate themselves from the competition.

I also love the large format header with the bird house icons above.

Overall the display had be running over to it, and is easily seen from thirty or more feet away.

Well done.