I <3 Pet Store Signage

An impromptu stop at my local Pet Supply Plus reminded me of how much I love simple graphics. And pet stores, with their categorization by pet type is a no-brainer for fun icon driven way finding graphics. Other chains such as Petsmart and PetCo are just as adept at this. It makes shopping for pet supplies, and pets for that matter, more fun in my opinion.

In PSP they use simple one color (plus white) graphics with pet icons and simple copy such as “CAT”. In a world with overwrought design direction it’s refreshing to see something so simple make it to retail, creating a pool of calm in what would otherwise be a visually clamorous environment.

Breathe.

Ahh…

The store also had a cool community themed endcap, which presumably is customized based on each store location. DO THIS IN YOUR STORE!!! Our research shows that people want a better sense of community in their lives. This endcap is just an example. Do what is right for your store and your community…a coffee desk, amp’d up bulletin board, in-line display…inside…outside…but do something to break away from the big-box photocopy mode.

Lastly I’ll pick on all retailers for a minute. There was a neat Kurgo display that obviously someone spent a lot of great effort and money on, only to be marred by a bunch of repetitive paper call outs on the scanner plates. I don’t know what the answer is but please why do we have to do this. Maybe an extruded price strip across all the hooks and alternate between price and a “new” callout. Maybe don’t use white on the callouts, maybe black or chocolate to match in store, or blue or orange to match the brand. This is 100% just me though and my need for organization and simplicity. So don’t get too worked up over it.

The Kurgo display was pretty rad though with its subtle topographical easter egg on its shroud that keen eyes will delight in discovering. I’d love to find out how they did that (both made it and got it past the bean counters).

I love chain pet stores as a source of inspiration, especially for graphic design and way finding. Think about including them in your pool of resources for inspiration on your next brand or retail project.

And you can always pick up some food for your furry friend while you’re at it.

-Chris


Chris Weigand is a retail experience expert, lover of simple design solutions, and a cat person. His views are his own and he receives no compensation for give products, brands and retailers a shout out. Where he and his firm do get compensation is from bring awesome retail solutions to you. Contact Chris today to discuss your needs – store interior, store within a store, pop up, displays, fixtures….he and his team can help your brand create delightfully awesome retail experiences. 330-858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddesign.com

Advertisements

Capabilities

 

CWD One PagerComputers and software are important tools for the work that we do. We model the things we design using computer aided design (CAD) software and produce renderings, sometimes photorealistic ones that are used to explain how something will look before it is built.

This past December we invested in a new liquid cooled PC based APEX4 machine from Boxx computers so that we could start running AutoDesk software. The software we’re running is 3ds Max which allows us to model up displays, fixtures and environments, map them and then create realistic renderings and animations for our clients. Adding this second machine and software, my wife and fellow designer Christine will now be able to help out when we need the extra capacity during busy times, or for projects that are best run on this system. This will free me up to focus on strategy, more involved projects and our business and clients more closely.

Our expertise is retail strategy and design, but to accompany this focus we’ve built a whole network of resources and capabilities that we can bring to bear, making life easier for our clients. We partner with other designers to bring additional perspective and resources. We have a vast network of manufacturers that can make anything we design, whether it’s one piece or a thousand. And we have all sorts of professionals we team up with for services such as engineering, photography, graphic design and copy writing. By bringing all of this together into one spot, our clients don’t have to manage everything themselves and they get just one bill in the mail. This is critical when you’re trying to grow your business today.

Here’s a recap of what we do:

  • retail strategy and design
  • research and trends
  • graphic design
  • interior design
  • product engineering
  • industrial design
  • project mangement
  • space planning
  • store planning / call center / reorder services
  • branding
  • copy writing
  • photography
  • interactive kiosk design and sourcing
  • global sourcing
  • packaging design
  • graphic visualization
  • presentation creation

At the top of this article is a photo of the latest marketing piece we created to share our new hardware news. We plan on rolling out more of these throughout the year to share with our clients and prospective clients. There will be a slight change in our own branding, moving away from the candy color marketing to more lifestyle imagery with simple single color branding, but with our good old logo form.

Also we’ll take some time to delve into each of the above services to explain more about what they mean and how we do them.

-Chris


 

Chris Weigand is an industrial designer and retail consultant. His handy work may be found in over thirty-thousand retail doors across the world. Whether your product is new to retail for you’re in thirty-thousand doors, he and his team can help you out, and make your life easier. Contact him at 330-858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddesign.com today.

2017 NAIAS Recap

MORE THAN CARS

Basic RGB

As has become tradition I drove up to Detroit for the North American International Auto Show last week. I really like cars so you don’t have to twist my arm to go to a car show. But I also take the opportunity to look at all the awesome pavilions, displays and design details throughout the show. And obviously the cars themselves have a lot of cool details as well.

As a courtesy to our clients, we put together a trend deck, which is basically several sheets summarizing the things seen at the show.

Color-wise, copper and electric blue were the hot colors. Copper was being used for detailing interiors, and coating a few exteriors as well. There were also copper details in the information desk environments such as mirror finish copper light fixtures, and laminate trim details. On the cars, copper could be seen in linear forms evocative of copper wiring in electric motors.

Speaking of electricity, electric cars are all the rage as manufacturers tool up for the forthcoming consumer demand for high mileage and eco-friendly transportation. Blue is the color of electric cars. Every car charger, electric car, and electric concept seemingly had an homage to the color blue, utilizing subtle and not so subtle uses of the color in paint, and lighting.

Museum quality displays were common too, as consumers focus more on one of kind features, and almost cottage like manufacturing vibes. Mazda played this up quite a bit with tools and material proudly displayed, evoking the idea that maybe these cars are hand built or at least hand designed out of raw materials and apprenticed craftsmanship.

There was plenty to see throughout the show, and while some was carryover, even those pavilions were freshened up for 2017.

Contact us if you’d like to learn more about what we saw at the show. Also if you’d like to accompany us to a future Detroit Auto Show or other event, let us know. We’d be happy to make arrangements to walk the show with you and exchange thoughts.

-Chris

Basic RGB


Chris Weigand is an industrial designer and president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC a retail strategy and design consultancy located in Peninsula, Ohio. When he’s not fawning over the latest car trends, he’s helping clients make kickass impressions at retail. Contact Chris at 330-858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddesign.com

Cafe, Not a Gas Station

Driving around I just noticed GetGo touts itself as a cafe and market first and foremost. Their website even says “cafe” in the name (www.getgocafe.com). For those not in the midwest, Get Go is Giant Eagle’s chain of convenience store gas stations. For me as a consumer, their formula of offering gas discounts for grocery shopping at their parent stores, works to keep me coming through the doors and stopping to get gas. I like the convenience, as well as fuel perks, anywhere from three cents do a dollar or more off of gasoline. Plus GetGo locations offer free air for everyone, which in arctic northeast Ohio, is a necessity (cold air in your tires condenses and ultimately tire pressures are lower in winter…anyway…).

So I love that they advertise themselves as a cafe. While I’ve never used them in this manner, I do appreciate the market part of the equation, and obviously the gas part too. And as a designer I can appreciate how they communicate “hey, we’re not just a gas station”. Places like GetGo and competitor Sheetz  have raised the bar beyond the gas station to the point where they are the destination, and the fuel is an added bonus of convenience. Go into either of these chains and you find modern, clean stores with great coffee, ready to eat food, beer, wine and convenience items, as well as space to take a break for lunch or coffee if need be. Sheetz even has expanded awnings above its fuel filling stations that stretch to the front doors, almost begging you to step inside for something you need. (Please though, move your car first so other can fuel up). Both brands, GetGo and Sheetz are well positioned for a future in which petrol-only refueling is on the wane, and convenience and satisfying experience is at the forefront.

The world of driving and convenience is going to look a lot different in five to ten years, and at that foundation will be stores like these that focus on the customer instead of product.

What do you like about the evolution of the gas station?

Where do you think it’s headed with the advent of autonomous, and electric cars?

Share your thoughts in the comments below.

-Chris

Article on Business Insider on Sheetz, if you’d like to find out more www.businessinsider.com/why-people-love-sheetz-2015-2

 

 

Why We Create Inspiration Boards

A lot of people (clients?) think designers turn a switch and crank out a creative solution in between trips to the Keurig. As great as that sounds the truth is creative problem solving, which is what design is, is anything but predictable and on demand. It’s a process that, in all honesty, designers are cycling through all the time; even when they’re not working on a specific project.

Creativity isn’t some bottomless well of rainbows, clay and iPhones. Designers need inspiration to couple with knowledge, skill and experience to create effective design solutions. I’m always looking at the world around me for inspiration. It’s like keeping a knife sharp. Staying inspired to create and solve.

There is a process to design. I like to start with a creative brief which outlines the task at hand, timing and deliverables. Next the team and I identify and research the brand, product and marketplace. At this time we look to trends and inspiration before we put pen to paper. Images, words and materials are arranged artfully on (typically virtual) “boards” that we reference throughout the design process. I liken it to cleansing your palate before a really good meal. Collecting information and then coupling that with trend and inspiration boards gets everyone in the right frame of mind to create a design solution. In fact we often include these boards in our final presentation so everyone understands what inspires the aesthetic and functional design details. It’s more about purposeful fact based design, and less about objective or personal preference. We never just throw stuff up on a wall.

I don’t know if there is a formal definition for any of the boards we create, but here is how I define them and how we use them, along with examples of boards we’ve created for clients.

Trend Board – whenever I travel I’m always looking at stores, buildings, products, displays, events; taking photos with my phone and collecting ideas. See enough of the same things in various places and you’re starting to see trends firsthand. I also look online at store websites to see seasonal collections, trend websites to see what they’re saying the latest trends are; anywhere we can get a pulse on society. And they may not always be images, products or colors. They could be social or shopping trends in which case we’ll capture that with an image of some sort.

cwd-sw-florida-indigo

This trend board highlights the popularity of the color indigo that we were seeing at retail in the winter of 2014. Actually indigo is a timeless color choice and always a good option to at least consider for many projects.

Inspiration / Mood – These are the most fun because they can be virtually anything, and while they are somewhat subjective, they help inspire the designer to design. Pinterest and Google searches are great places to find inspirational images. As a designer I look to colors, textures, product design details, fashion, nature, architecture, global influences, essentially anything and everything to generate inspiration boards. These boards inspire and set the tone for the design. A project could have just one or a dozen plus boards, it just depends on the scope and how much reference material we’re drawn to.

Here is a collection of some of our favorite mood boards that we’ve created. Gathering this inspiration for a project is one of our favorite parts of being designers.

inspire-page-2

A board with images of people helps set the tone for the project and get us in the right mindset. We can use this as a benchmark when evaluating concepts to see if they evoke these emotions.

inspire-board-5

A mixture of materials, product, fashion and historical images makes for a great mood board.

inspire-3

A board focused on how great black and charcoal make colors pop.

inspire-board-4

These simple boards are some of the best in conveying an idea. Note the composition of the board isn’t happenstance either, it helps convey the mood or feel we’re trying to get across.

inspire-page-1

We often like to have a theme to a board, such as “line” on this one. The all wood images are purposeful too, as the display in question we knew was going to feature this light wood tone.

Word Cloud – occasionally on larger or deeper projects we’ll collect words and create a word cloud to inspire us and keep us on task. These words help us define the problem and what success looks like. It’s created at the beginning and we use it at the end to weigh our design solutions against – to make sure we are on brand.

word-cloud

Words can be just as effective in setting the tone for a project. They are also helpful in judging a solution to see if it is on brand and effective.

Material Board – It’s good to have a sense of what materials will work with the brand or product we’re promoting at retail. We’ll also consider the materials of the surrounding space that we may not be able to control. A material board can be “high level” indicating general wood tones, paint colors, and materials such as glass and plastic. Or we might get very specific and call out actual laminate names and numbers or paint specs. The material board is created in concert with trend and inspiration boards; it might even be created after we’ve started the design process.

gm-materials-board

A materials board for a snack bar project. It includes possible laminates, graphic colors, paint colors, and inspiration images that drove the color selection.

One last note, sometimes we even combine several of these into one board to help guide us through a project or tier the various concepts we know we’re going to work on. Below is an example of how we combined a word cloud with inspirational images to set the tone for a specific concept that was yet to be designed.

tiering concepts 02

There you have it, my quick overview of these fun design tools and why we use them. Where do you find inspiration? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks.

-Chris


Chris Weigand is president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC in Peninsula, Ohio. Gathering inspiration is one of his favorite parts of the design process. His love of nature, automobiles, art and architecture all manifest themselves in his designs. If you’d like to find out more about how Chris and his team can help inspire your next amazing design experience, visit the CWD website at http://www.chrisweiganddesign.com and contact him by phone at (330) 858-8926 or email at chris@chrisweiganddesign.com

You can visit the Chris Weigand Design Pinterest page by clicking here to start getting inspired today. Be sure to follow us.

Catch the Pokemon Wave

Seemingly out of nowhere Pokemon Go took over the world earlier this July. The free downloadable app was, and still is, the talk of social and news media. Turns out chasing imaginary creatures is getting everyone off of the couch and, for at least a moment or two, forgetting about elections, violence and all the bills they have to pay. It’s basically like a much welcome break from reality during a very hot and tiresome summer here in the U.S.

The app was launch without much anticipation or fanfare, but none the less has resulted in big bucks for Nintendo, the parent company that owns the Pokemon brand. Their evaluation was up way over 25%, or $11 billion (that’s with a “b”) in just a week according to an article on qz.com. Even if you don’t believe what they say as far as valuation goes, there is no denying the initial impact of the app on our short attention span society.

How long will the party last? Who knows. But what can and should you do to make the best of an incredible situation?

Merchants Seize the Opportunity

Not surprisingly, savvy merchants are taking advantage of everyone getting off of their couches and getting out to find imaginary creatures in our cities, towns and parks. A pizza shop in Long Island spent $10 on “lures” to lure Pokemon, and the people looking to capture Pokemon, to their shop and their sales were up 75% over the weekend.

Soon merchants will be able to sponsor their location to attract even more customers.

The beauty of the app is it’s getting people of every demographic off the couch and out into society looking for these critters. Families are putting down the iPads and wanting to go on hikes, or visit downtown to find Pokemon. Business people are taking a few minutes at lunch or before work exploring to find Pokemon. And when people are exploring, they get hungry, thirsty and want to visit your store.

A Spearow by Starbucks? Why yes, I’ll stop in for a latte.

Take Advantage of the Pokemon Go Trend

In the game there are “PokeStops” where gamers can get much needed enhancements to the game. As a merchant, download the app and figure out where the closest PokeStop is to you. If you’re lucky your venue may even be one, which should already be attracting people. In our town there are several churches and businesses that are PokeStops or PokeGyms.

As mentioned, it doesn’t cost much to “lure” Pokemon and their explorers to your shop. You get a couple free lures when you sign up, and additional ones only cost a few dollars and last for a half hour. Spread the word on social media that you dropped a lure and wait for customers.

Once there, be creative with how you seize the Pokemon phenomenon. Tout your business as “Pokemon Central” by offering provisions for explorers – water, food, licensed product. Maybe make it social by starting a club or offering discounts for people who’ve found certain Pokemon. Create photo ops for people to take pictures with their yet to be captured Pokemon in front of your store.

Missed the Wave?

No idea what Pokemon Go is, or you missed it completely? No worries, in our short attention span society there will surely be another app, event or trend that you can seize to amp up your bottom line.

Take the time to be aware of trends as they happen. Regularly read the news, and pay attention to social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to hear what people are talking about. Observe you customers and talk to them to find out what they’re interested in.

My family didn’t pick up on Pokemon Go until three days into it, by then it was on the mainstream media. But there is still plenty of life in the trend cycle for Pokemon Go as they add features and improve the app.

Even if you missed it, establish habits now for how your business will react to social trends in order to enhance your bottom line. Trend watching is just as important as inventory, customer service and pricing for your business. With good habits and creativity you may be discovering some happy additions to your bottom line by year’s end.

In the meantime I think there’s a Rattata in the office that needs to be caught…

-Chris


When not out looking for Pokemon, Chris Weigand is an industrial designer specializing in branding and retail design. As president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC, Chris and his team help some of the largest brands and retailers in the world, as well as independents, local and start-ups connect with customers out in the marketplace. Contact Chris today at (330) 858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddeisgn.com to find out how he can help your brand seize upon the latest trends influencing the marketplace.

Cool Carpet

An interesting catalog arrived in the mail this week – it was from FLOR. Not surprisingly, they make floor carpet tiles. I may have seen them before, or even gotten one of their catalogs before, but for whatever reason my interest was rekindled in the concept of floor tiles.

IMG_9116.JPG

Looking at the patterns in the catalog I started thinking, you know this is really an awesome product because the possibilities are endless. You can get the look of a traditional carpet / area rug but with a lot more design freedom.

The recyclable tiles are 19.7″ square and they go together easily with little FLORdots in the corners.

We’re finishing off space in the basement of our home office right now, and this product would be perfect to go over the porcelain tile to warm things up visually and physically.

Presumably you could likely use FLOR in a commercial or office setting, though the website doesn’t say specifically.

Pricing isn’t too bad either, comparable to a similarly sized area rug.

Here are some of our favs from their website:

 

 

-Chris