Railroad Dining Car Interior Project

We just completed a pretty neat project for the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad (CVSR) here in northeast Ohio. The railroad refurbished the interior of a multipurpose car and they asked us to help out with the interior design. The 80’+ long car was stripped bare on the inside by CVSR volunteers and lovingly put back together. As a multipurpose car it will primarily be used for dining, but with moveable chairs and tables, the car may be configured for various other events such as wine & painting excursions, and holiday parties.

Our design team initially proposed three material concepts: “Nature”, “Eclectic” and “Tailored”. Each was inspired by a different set of images, materials and concepts.

CVSR-Multipurpose-Car-02a

 

The Railroad selected the Eclectic theme which was focused on earthy spice tones. The foundation of the design is a wild botanical pattern carpet from Milliken. From there we built off of the carpet by selecting Sherwin Williams Resort Tan (SW 7550) for the walls and accents. This is a versatile color that can fit in a variety of situations. It’s an earthy mushroom tone that changes color depending on how the light hits it. And it allows for a broad range of complementary colors to set any mood. The monochromatic scheme inside the multipurpose car provides a warm inviting space, perfect for romantic dinner train rides.Screen Shot 2018-03-28 at 11.29.11 AM.png

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The painted car, ready for carpet. Note the ceiling is actually existing carpet that we didn’t replace. Up closed it is a variety of blue and red, but looks blackish brown from far away.

Simple dining chairs with a dark brown fabric and satin black powder-coat were selected for their durability and ability to hide stains, as people of all ages will be using the car for a variety of activities, not just dining. Existing tables were reused to keep the budget in check, and they can be outfitted in any number of ways depending on need and mood.

Light tan colored curtains from Carnegie help to lighten and soften the interior a bit. There was much debate on how they should attach and what their final form should be. The team went back and looked at historical photos for reference and landed on two single curtains per widow, with a gap between one curtain and then the next on subsequent windows.

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For a final touch, the Railroad sourced vintage luggage for the luggage racks. This adds a nice historic touch without a doubt, but the luggage also provides a means to hide speakers and wiring. Check out the photos below, clicking on them to zoom in.

This was our first foray into rail car design, and we learned quite a bit on this exciting project. Trains are amazing attractions, and fun for the whole family. Every car is unique and has a history all its own. We look forward to the opportunity to work on more of these cars in the future. Visit the CVSR website www.CVSR.com to view all of their upcoming excursions, and you can see the car firsthand.

-Chris


Chris Weigand is president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC. Our boutique firm specializes in unique retail and interior experiences, both fixed and rolling along the rails. We are a small network of experts with decades of experience providing world class industrial, interior, graphic and user experience design. We’ve worked on projects for over 250+ different brands, organizations and retailers. Contact us today to discuss your design needs, we are happy and excited to work with you.

330-858-8926 or Chris@ChrisWeigandDesign.com

 

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3 Things I Like About LinkedIn(‘s Office)

While eating my Honeycomb┬« cereal and enjoying my coffee this morning I caught up on some of the trade mags I have piling up. In the June 2018 issue of Contract magazine I came across an article on the LinkedIn NYC office that M Moser designed recently. It’s a really nice looking office, with well thought out details throughout.

There is a lot of good stuff going on in this office space, if anything maybe too much, but I’m okay with everything I read and saw in the article. Here are three things that particularly tickled my design fancy:

linked in office image 1

Color square dividing wall.

Most of the renovated office is actually food service for the employees. The various food stations have different themes based on NYC parks. And apparently the Highline Park themed one has this excellent translucent color square wall divider. I love to nod to the skyline that surrounds the park, and the colors were selected deftly; greens at the bottom with blue skies and purple buildings and / or flora. I love the idea and it was executed well. The wall adds a perfect pop of color in a purposefully muted space.

Linked in office image 2

Extra long lamp cords, artfully arranged on the walls.

I think I’ve seen this before, but I still like it no less. In the article’s one photo they show overhead lams with purposefully long cords. The cords are arranged artfully on two walls to create modern wall art. I love the double duty of the cords acting as art which also negates the need to add another “thing” to the space in order to avoid blank walls. It’s a touch that, while may seem impractical and inefficient to some, actually kills two birds with one design stone thus being the very definition of efficiency. It also speaks to attention to detail both in design and everyday work life – a subtle reminder all can benefit from.

linked in image 3

Full size chess board on carpet tiles (presumably).

Last is the fun, life size chess board made out of (what I’m assuming are) carpet squares. Why didn’t I think of that? Only downside is it’s virtually impossible to discuss work during a chess match if you’re doing either right, I feel. That’s probably the point. Keep your mind sharp, while taking a break from helping people network.

Kudos to M Moser, LinkeIn and Contract for creating and sharing this project with the world. It’s a design feast of all the details that can make a work space delightful, engaging and appealing.

-Chris


Chris Weigand is an industrial designer and retail design consultant based in northeast Ohio. He may be contacted at 330-858-8926. All magazine images are borrowed from the June 2018 issue of Contract Design Magazine