Capabilities

 

CWD One PagerComputers and software are important tools for the work that we do. We model the things we design using computer aided design (CAD) software and produce renderings, sometimes photorealistic ones that are used to explain how something will look before it is built.

This past December we invested in a new liquid cooled PC based APEX4 machine from Boxx computers so that we could start running AutoDesk software. The software we’re running is 3ds Max which allows us to model up displays, fixtures and environments, map them and then create realistic renderings and animations for our clients. Adding this second machine and software, my wife and fellow designer Christine will now be able to help out when we need the extra capacity during busy times, or for projects that are best run on this system. This will free me up to focus on strategy, more involved projects and our business and clients more closely.

Our expertise is retail strategy and design, but to accompany this focus we’ve built a whole network of resources and capabilities that we can bring to bear, making life easier for our clients. We partner with other designers to bring additional perspective and resources. We have a vast network of manufacturers that can make anything we design, whether it’s one piece or a thousand. And we have all sorts of professionals we team up with for services such as engineering, photography, graphic design and copy writing. By bringing all of this together into one spot, our clients don’t have to manage everything themselves and they get just one bill in the mail. This is critical when you’re trying to grow your business today.

Here’s a recap of what we do:

  • retail strategy and design
  • research and trends
  • graphic design
  • interior design
  • product engineering
  • industrial design
  • project mangement
  • space planning
  • store planning / call center / reorder services
  • branding
  • copy writing
  • photography
  • interactive kiosk design and sourcing
  • global sourcing
  • packaging design
  • graphic visualization
  • presentation creation

At the top of this article is a photo of the latest marketing piece we created to share our new hardware news. We plan on rolling out more of these throughout the year to share with our clients and prospective clients. There will be a slight change in our own branding, moving away from the candy color marketing to more lifestyle imagery with simple single color branding, but with our good old logo form.

Also we’ll take some time to delve into each of the above services to explain more about what they mean and how we do them.

-Chris


 

Chris Weigand is an industrial designer and retail consultant. His handy work may be found in over thirty-thousand retail doors across the world. Whether your product is new to retail for you’re in thirty-thousand doors, he and his team can help you out, and make your life easier. Contact him at 330-858-8926 or chris@chrisweiganddesign.com today.

Retail Design: Behind The Scenes

The average consumer likely doesn’t think about it too much, but a lot goes into all the displays and fixtures we see at retail everyday. Today I would like to provide some “behind the scenes” real world insight into the effort that goes into designing for retail.

Where Retail Design Comes From

There are a variety of resources creating the designs that go into every retail space, including in-house designers, architects, consultants, freelance designers and manufacturers. Often times two or more of these resources will team together to provide the final retail design solutions for a brand or retailer. In many cases in-house design teams have shrunk, or need additional capacity, so they will work with outside creative resources, building a highly capable creative team to work on a specific project. The brand or retailer client may not even know this is the case because the team will work seamlessly behind the scenes. Some design providers have no problem letting clients know they are leveraging the best and the brightest professional creative talent for their projects. As a professional designers we adapt our approach specific to every situation and client to assure the end result is the best it can be, whether anyone knows we worked on a project or not.

You Always Pay For Design, Even If You Don’t Think You Do

Like they say, you get what you pay for. For most of my career design was “free”. Clients would pit several design providers, often manufacturers, against each other. Then they would select the design they liked and give it to the cheapest manufacturer. Fortunately as we emerge from the economic downturn, and everyone has slashed creative staffs, brands and retailers are realizing that design isn’t free anymore. Or at least good design isn’t free. Projects are more curated, and carry a lot of weight in the success or decline at retail. Good design takes specific skills, creativity and knowledge. Why leave your business to chance just to save a few dollars? Invest in good design and it will pay you back ten fold throughout the process. The decisions your design team makes early on in the process impacts every aspect of your retail business.

As such, good clients now understand the true value of a comprehensive design approach, and are willing to engage, and pay for, design separately from manufacturing. Sure house accounts typically have a certain amount of design services built into their budgets, and a prospective client may get a round of free design consultation, but no longer should they expect that to be the case, indefinitely. The retail business can no longer support that model. So you can either pay sooner for design or pay later to fix problems. We prefer you pay for design.

We’re Constantly Working

Designers never shut off. We’re constantly thinking, designing, researching…looking for inspiration….looking for improvement.  We work in fits and flashes. Creativity can’t just be turned on, but often times that’s what we have to do to meet a dizzying array of due dates. For every billable hour I would bet there is at least one hour spent building the creative foundation that is applied to any given project. There’s a good chance your next retail design solution was born whilst a designer was driving somewhere or taking a shower.

We Love Retail

Speaking for myself, I actually love shopping. I love being in stores. The people, the products, the displays, for me it is a one stop shop to see all kinds of materials, designs, ideas in practice. Plus, despite being an advocate for the environment, I actually love buying stuff (just in moderation). When I  go “retailing” for a project I keep thinking to myself “This is the best job in the world.” So while most of us aren’t technically merchants or marketers, we love and understand retail. As designers we understand all the things that influence success or failure at retail: products, environments, consumers, manufacturing, marketing, merchandising and business.  We take a holistic approach and know how to work directly with everyone throughout the process. Often times the designer may be the only advocate for an interested party that isn’t in the meeting room.

We’re Judging You

If you have a store then we’re judging you every time we visit. But it’s a constructive judging. Really.

We know all of your dirty little secrets that consumers may not consciously pick up on. We can see when something was not executed according to plan. On the other hand we also celebrate really awesome retail designs and problem solving. And we straighten things up because deep inside we want the store to look as great in person as it did in the renderings. We’re also looking at everything from the parking lot to the entrance, and beyond to each department and display. We evaluate how well your brand communicates through your store. We get ideas and inspiration.

We don’t mean to judge, but we have to in order to make sure what we’re designing for you or other merchants is the best, relevant and effective solution possible.

Covert Operations

Last but not least this is the funnest part of the retail design job: covert operations. If we’re designing a display or fixture for a retailer, then we need to get into the stores and measure the existing environment and often times take photographs. It’s easy if you’re working directly for the retailer. You just call and get permission from your contact. More often than not my client is not that retailer. I’ve designed displays for virtually every major retailer in North America over the last twenty years and I know for a fact none of them would know me, but they know my work.

The reality is we have to go under cover. With tight deadlines looming, and tight-lipped clients not wanting to let their customers know they’ve outsourced design, we need to put our James Bond hats on. Like an overseas CIA undercover agent we’re alone and no one knows who we are. There’s no one to call.

We make every effort to speak with on-site store representatives to let them know we need to measure a fixture or take a photo for reference. This is often met with middling results, and depends on who you talk to. We spend a lot of time explaining that we’re retail designers to glazed eyes.

Assuming I’m not escorted off the premises, I will discretely walk the store and measure any necessary fixtures that my display will need to attach to or work with. I’ll  take photographs to use as reference in designing the new display. The advent of good cameras on cell phones is a life saver. Clients love seeing displays in actual store environments so I’ll snap some photos for that purpose as well. I avoid photos with people in them.

If you are a merchant, please  let responsible retail designers discretely measure and photograph in your stores. We earn our living making your store environment the best it can be for your store and the brands you carry.

There you have it, some insight into our world. I hope you enjoyed it and found it useful. Here are some examples of what we look for and output when we’re designing for retail. These are all older images so no retail environments were harmed in the making of this blog post.

Have any design “secrets” you’d like to share?

Have you ever been thrown out of a store? (I have by the way)

Share in the comments section below.

-Chris

Chris Weigand is president of Chris Weigand Design, LLC a full service retail design consultancy. He is a professional industrial designer who’s innovative, consumer focused retail designs can be seen in virtually every major retailer in North America. Whether you have one store or 5,000 stores Chris Weigand Design would love to work with you on your next retail design project. Visit http://www.chrisweiganddesign.com for more information or contact Chris at 330-858-8926.

Design For Independent Retailers

photo via Corbisimages.com

photo via Corbisimages.com

In honor of Global Shop next week we thought we’d would share with you our thoughts on how independent retailers can benefit from engaging the services of a retail design consultancy. Regardless of whether run a “pop-up”, one store or a dozen stores it’s worth considering enlisting some outside help if you want and need it to give your retail experience a shot in the arm.

A Design Team Works Within Your Budget

You are the expert when it comes to your business. We’ll say that time and time again. You built it from the ground up. There’s no denying your knowledge and dedication. Why would you need or want a design consultant?

Well, sometimes it’s good to get a fresh set of eyes looking at something. They can provide experienced and professional insight. And it may be worth getting some help so you can step back to concentrate on other aspects of the business that need your attention more. A consultant costs as much, or as little as you have budgeted for your project. And they can help immensely.

As a retail design consultancy we start by meeting with you to review your business; learn from you the opportunities you face and assess areas where we can add value. A retail design services can run from a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands of dollars depending on the scope and complexity of the project. The services you’ll receive are outlined in a proposal ahead of time, and each phase can be agreed upon to suit your time and budgetary needs. Truly, no project is too big or small.

Retail Designers Offer A Variety Of Services

Whether you are just starting out or you’ve been in the business for ages, it is critical that you connect to customers and your brand speaks with one voice. There are a variety of ways a design team can help. Here are some examples that would be of benefit to independent retailers:

Graphic Design – this includes branding, such as creating a logo or style guide for your store. Also graphic design covers in store signage and way-finding. The designers can use art, illustration, typography and photography to create inspiring graphics that hit your guests sense of style and emotion, putting them in the frame of mind to fall in love with your brand. Related to graphics is packaging design – so if you have a need to actually brand product, say juice bottles, soap or salon products – the design team can design those solutions as well to give a cohesive brand message to guests.

Interior Design – this is retail experience on a macro level. Everything on the inside of your store, from flooring to walls to lighting and ceiling influences how guests feel while they are shopping. Also space planning which is important, so that your store has good traffic flow. It can be as simple as rearranging and curating what you already have, to a complete extreme store makeover.

Visual Merchandising & Display Design – in concert with graphics, the design of the displays and fixtures that your products go on can make a impact on the experience. Your designer can select stock displays or design custom ones that can be made within your budget. Displays make sure your product is the star and is delightful to shop. Visual Merchandising attracts and helps tell your story.

Project Management & Sourcing – the design team can manage the project from kickoff, to design brief, through design and specification, ultimately to retail implementation. Designers are experts at managing multiple programs and assuring they are completed to specification, on time and on budget. Especially if you are trying something out for the first time, having sourcing help can come in handy.

Research, Trends, and Sustainability Consulting – design firms are a great resource for the latest trends, or areas where you may not be as knowledgable such as environmental sustainability. Plus if you need someone to research the market, your competition or your customers, a consultancy can provide those services. This can help your business beyond just how your store looks and functions.

A Retail Design Team Works With You

As I said, you’re the expert when it comes to your brand. Meet with your designers and assess your unique business and brand situation. Then the design team will make recommendations and provide design solutions as necessary. Equally important they’ll tell you what you don’t need. It certainly is not a one person dance; the design team you’ve hired is your partner. They’ll bring fresh perspective and interesting ideas, and be able to work seamlessly with your in-house resources. In the end your brand story will attract and connect with guests at every touch point. And you will save yourself from the frustration, not to mention time and money, of trying to do everything yourself.

You may not need an outside design firm to help you out. I’ve been in plenty of independent retailers that are doing an awesome job all by themselves. But at least be aware that these services are out there. They add value to the most critical part of your business: telling your brand story to guests. Take advantage of the professional perspective, creativity and talent that a retail design team can bring to your store.

The brand you built deserves it.

In what ways do you think you could benefit from engaging a retail designer?

If you don’t use a designer, why not?

Share your thoughts in the comments below. Happy retailing merchant peeps!

Chris Weigand has been designing innovative retail solutions for over 15 years. The results of his work can be found in over 30,000 retail doors, enhancing the shopper experience and improving sales. If you are an independent retailer who would like to find out how Chris Weigand Design can help your brand connect with guests, visit our website at www.chrisweiganddesign.com We are actively looking for great new clients to partner with, creating awesome retail experiences.

Want Insight Into Your Designer Before You Hire? Try Pinterest.

Chris Weigand Design on Pinterest

Chris Weigand Design on Pinterest

Picking a designer, architect or agency can be daunting. You ask around for references, check out a few websites, review some of their past projects and interview them in person. All of this will likely give you a good feel for how they operate and their approach to your project.

When it comes to their aesthetic sensibilities or design philosophy that may not always be clear as day. While it is good to see how they creatively solved design problems for other clients, there is value in getting a feel for what inspires and drives your potential design team. As I was crafting our company’s Pinterest page, I started thinking: Pinterest is an awesome way to see how we think as designers. It affords a random stranger or potential client to see what we are inspired by, like and appreciate, as professional designers.

Pinterest is an all-encompassing inspiration board for our design team. When working on a project we almost always generate inspiration boards as part of our design research. While these internal boards are specific to the project, they often pull images from Pinterest (and other resources) that reflect who we are as designers; how we aesthetically and functionally will solve the problem at hand.

Here’s why I think a designer or agency’s Pinterest page is a good place to check out when trying to get a sense of their style and design aesthetic / philosophy.

Categorized – When creating boards in Pinterest I try to cover all ways design is inspired. There are categories for retail (our specialty), product, graphic and interior design. Architecture is well represented with its own category as well as home related design and decor. Fashion lives in separate categories for women and men. Rounding out the core boards is one for “Color”, “Nature” and world travel. I also like to include the occasional specialty board like “Global Spice” that is a combination of all of the above, with a focus on eclectic, cultural design. Lastly there are boards for quotes, celebrity / historic photos and “Fun” to give potential clients a feel for how we think beyond design.

Curated – The selection of pins on their Pinterest board usually is a curated. Each pin is there for a reason. Over time the boards and pins will be refined. Personally I browse the internet, other Pinterest boards, and even my own photos. Anything that stands out gets pinned immediately. Then I’ll come back and add or subtract. I’ll also look at the captions and re-word them to state why we like the pin. Curated boards are alive – like a living species that is evolving over time.

Trends – It goes without saying Pinterest is a great source for trends. I don’t know if anyone has studied the site to see if it actually influences or creates trends, but my guess is at the very least some trends start to see the light of day there. Most trend setters – individuals and companies – have a page on the site so it gives us access to a vast array of design trends that we can browse. If I’m seeing the same types of things over and over again, I’ll create a board on our page or for internal purposes.

Design Network – The company your designer keeps is another good indicator of their design approach. Take a look at who your design professional follows, and who follows their boards. I just started our company boards (I’ve had my own personal Pinterest page for a year or two) and we already have a few followers. I’m always excited to see people and companies following our boards, who we hold in high aesthetic esteem. It’s also a great way to discover “pinners” who have a great sense of style that aren’t household names…yet.

Inspiration – Likely the most important point here, you get to see what inspires a design team. What images, quotes, ideas do they gravitate towards. Keep in mind, any design pro worth their consulting fee will arrive at a solution that is appropriate to you and the situation regardless of their personal taste. But I feel as a client you should be interested in what inspires the person or team that you’re entrusting your project to. Seeing that philosophy manifested in a fascinating series of image boards is an awesome reassurance.

With all of this in mind, spend some time exploring your design professional’s Pinterest site. I think you’ll find that you will get a good feel for their design sense. Design is subjective and there are a variety of ways to arrive at really great solutions. If all designers were the same the world would be a very boring place. Pinterest is a great tool to use during your design professional search. Do yourself a favor and go exploring.

Have you used Pinterest when evaluating companies and professionals? 

What else, beyond what I mentioned, do you like about Pinterest?

Share you thoughts in the comments below.

-Chris Weigand, President – Chris Weigand Design, LLC

chris@chrisweiganddesign.com

Chris Weigand Design is a retail design consultancy specializing in helping product brands and independent retailers connect with guests at retail. We create visual merchandising, display, graphic and interior retail design solutions. We also can provide space planning, project management and sourcing services if needed. Check out our Pinterest page at www.pinterest.com/cweiganddesign/ to get a sense of our style and the latest trends we’re seeing. Contact us today if you’d like to discuss your project. We’d love to work with you.

A Retail Design Roadmap For Product Brands

Make your product the star.  RF image via Corbis.com

Make your product the star.
RF image via Corbis.com

It’s all about the product silly

You’ve got a product.

Your team has been working on it for months, maybe years. Focus groups love it. Everything is perfect. You may even be selling it online and sales have been awesome. Retailers are clamoring for it and you are ready to make the jump to physically selling your product in a store.

If your brand is new to retail (e.g. a small company, or just starting out) you may not be sure what to do next. Not surprisingly we highly recommend you speak with a retail design consultancy who will be able to access your situation, provide a recommendation as well as design and other services if necessary. Obviously partnering with you is where they make their money, but an initial conversation shouldn’t cost much, if anything, and it’ll be a huge help. Full disclosure: this is what we do for a living so if you need someone…wink, wink. Seriously though, even if you don’t hire us, these guidelines are fairly universal as far as we’re concerned. We not convinced that going straight to a manufacture is always the best route, as they are primarily interested in making things that you may or may not need, that may or may not be in sync with your product and brand. Ask a lot of questions if you’re just starting out.

“…your product needs to be the star of the show.”

First and foremost, you may be able to simply ship your product into the retailer and they’ll take it from there. This will save you a lot of time and money (and hassle). The primary down side is that you may not control how your product is merchandised.  The retailer will do whatever they please, or whatever you can work out with them. On the plus side they want to sell your product too. Cross your fingers. If this is the case, spend extra time working on your packaging design and packaging graphics. Your product packaging is going to have to do all of the heavy lifting at retail to shout your brand and attract guests who hopefully convert to customers who will buy your product. In fact regardless of the situation at retail, spend time (and money) on your packaging design, especially the graphics. Regardless of whatever else you do, your product needs to be the star of the show. One quick note: make sure you’re branding is in good order too – great packaging and graphic design won’t cover up an incoherent brand message.

Suppose you have a little more leeway – you’ve got the budget, the retailer asks or allows you to provide display or graphics, whatever the case may be. Your brand shouts loud and clear through your exquisitely designed packaging. Now you want to amp up your retail experience. Here are a few ways you can do this.

Graphics / Signage – These will give you the most bang for your buck, and flexibility. Signs generally are inexpensive and require little or no tooling. These are good qualities for agile product brands looking to make an impact at retail. Signs can fit into stock or custom holders. The store may even already have graphic holders in place. The possibilities are endless for size and location: small shell callouts, headers that assist with way finding, aisle signs, overhead…there are a lot of options. Start with attracting and informing guests – put them in the right mindset to buy your product, and go from there. Your retail design consultancy will develop attention-getting graphics that make guests swoon when they catch sight of your product at retail. Art files in hand you can use your favorite printer or a good consultancy can handle the sourcing and project management portion to assure signs are produced to spec, on budget and delivered to each retail door on time.

Temporary Display – These are any displays that are meant to be recycled once your product sells out. Occasionally you may restock these display but not usually. They’re typically made from corrugated board, and designed to last around six months at retail give or take 3-6 months. We really love temp displays for a few reasons. In this day and age they can look really nice, with litho labels and exotic finishes. Or if you want to go the opposite route, direct-printing has gotten so refined that you probably don’t need anything more than that. Retailers are mixed on how well they like temp displays, so work it out with them first. Temp displays can be as simple as a PDQ (pretty “damn” quick) that is simply a box that is shipped, opened up and put on a shelf, to elaborate display environments that showcase your brand. Your design consultancy will be able to leverage their expertise and creativity to develop an awesome solution for your product, and once again help if necessary throughout the process to get both your product and display out to retail.

Permanent Displays – Permanent means that they are meant to last up to seven years or so at retail, give or take a few years. They are often made from wood, plastic or metal and the product is restocked whenever it runs out. Depending on how they are designed, costs can rise quickly because tooling for jigs, fixtures, dies and molds may be involved; costing anywhere from a thousand to tens of thousand of dollars. That being said, a good designer will be review / manage expectations and design to a budget. You need to determine to what extent the display is the star of the show. Too often we’ve seen brands and retailers try to make up for middling product by creating overwrought displays. Have an open conversation with the retail design team that you’ve hired. As I’ve said, we like to have the product and the brand experience be the focus for guests, displays are a means to that end. Another thing to consider is modularity. If you have a family of products or retailers that your product is going into, a modular system can help lower cost and increase flexibility. Once the design phase is complete, your consultancy can either hand you the final specs or help see the entire project through to retail execution.

Ultimately everything needs to work in concert. The above are just three simplified examples….tools designers use to market your product and brand at retail. And really the best way to find out is to talk with a design consultant about your project. It’s like building a house, you can pick a plan out of a book, rely on your general contractor to handle the design and build, or hire an architect. The first two might be okay for your product or brand situation. But if you don’t want to leave things to chance, if your brand is more than a commodity, just as your home is more than just a building, you should consider hiring a retail design consultancy. Like an architect, the consultancy works with you from start to finish to imagine, design and specify a solution that is perfect for your brand, product and retail situation. And they are a valuable voice for your brand throughout the process when dealing with vendors and retailers as well.

“Of all the things you could get for free, why would your brand  gamble with seemingly free design?”

No, design isn’t free. But it is the most important money you will spend and it is a fraction of the cost of your overall retail program. Design decisions influence so much downstream, one hiccup during the design phase can translate into death at retail. If you think you’re getting “free” design, there is no such thing; it’s likely bundled into the price of something else down stream. Your brand isn’t a commodity, it shouldn’t be treated as such; left to chance with the lowest bidder. You know this, after all you designed your product in-house or paid someone to design it. Of all the things you could get for free, why would your brand gamble with seemingly free design?

A retail design consultancy will provide awesome solutions and help guide you throughout the process, eliminating  many of the pitfalls that you would face if you went at it alone.

Does your organization pay for design? Why or why not? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

-Chris Weigand

President, Chris Weigand Design, LLC

Chris Weigand Design, LLC is professional retail design consultancy based in northeast Ohio. We strongly believe that a design consultancy is your best bet for assuring your product is merchandised at retail properly and guests fall in love with your brand. Contact us today to find out how we can help you with expert graphic, display and interior design services. Beyond design, if you need help managing the production of your solutions, we know how to make that happen also. Visit us at www.chrisweiganddesign.com

Chris Weigand Design – Focus, Web & Blog Updates

I’ve spent the last two days refreshing our website. As much as I like to read, and write (obviously), I felt the sight was just to overbearing. I reduced the number of pages and tried to streamline the site to be more in line with our philosophy of simplicity.

The revamped site also is the first look as we start to focus our business. We’re evolving to focus on retail design, and specifically helping independent retailers. We feel that we have a lot of creativity, experience and resources to offer this growing market that has been previously underserved.

You’ll now find links to this blog and our Pinterest page as well, in the ‘CONNECT’ tab. Click here to visit our website.

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 7.32.01 PM

Since I removed a lot of content from the website, I didn’t want to just throw it out, so now if you look at the menu on this blog, you’ll notice a few new pages for you to read.

Maxims are our roadmap for how we conduct business. This page gives clients the chance to read what we stand for and what to expect from us.

In addition to our maxims, we operate with the ‘triple-bottom-line’ of people, planet and profit in everything we do. We are a business, and our goal is to grow into a world-class design firm. My hope is that in just a few years we grow into an awesome team of in-house talent that is having a hell of a good time designing really cool stuff, for freakishly great clients. In order to do that our compass has to point in the right direction. Being good socially aware, environmentally concerned, business people is going to assure our compass is giving us a bearing towards success. Check out the pages to learn more.

Screen Shot 2014-02-26 at 7.58.06 PM

Please, if you haven’t already, think about your business and implement these sort of practices. I’ve got no problem if you want to use what we’ve written as a spring board for your team. And if you have any suggestions on how we can improve our roadmap, let us know.

Look for upcoming articles here that delve into these in more detail. Also we’ll examine how we can help independent retailers in preparation for GlobalShop 2014 in Las Vegas next month.

Thanks for your support.

-Chris Weigand

President, Chris Weigand Design, LLC

Peninsula, OH, USA

Chris Weigand Design is a retail design consultancy based in northeast Ohio. We design and specify displays, retail graphics and retail interiors. We are also expert project managers and can source virtually anything we design. Retail experience is an extension of your brand and is the first touch-point your customers have with your product. Don’t leave anything to chance. Contact us today to give your brand a voice in the process of merchandising your product or service.

How Design Adds Value To Retail Projects

Hiring a designer for your retail project can be a difficult decision. You may have already spent a lot of time developing something awesome only to find yourself stuck and unsure of what to do next. Maybe you haven’t even started yet. Regardless of where you are at in the process of developing a retail strategy for your product or service, you can benefit from the help of a professional retail designer.

I’ve been working in the retail design industry for nearly two decades and have been involved in the process on both sides: as a designer and a client. While you may not think you need a designer, or think you can’t afford it, I urge you to look at your project as a whole and then decide. Design is often overlooked and most brands scoff at the idea of actually paying for professional design work. But consider the decisions that are made during the design phase will influence most, if not all, of the downstream process AND their associated costs. The overall cost of retail projects can run from a few hundred to a few million dollars. The cost for design typically is a small fraction of that. The decision to invest in professional help may be a very wise one.

There are a variety of designers you may hire for your project depending on your needs, such as industrial, graphic and packaging designers. You may even hire a consulting firm that has one or more of these types that can be brought to bear. The various aspects of the design process are somewhat universal across disciplines. Designers bring value in many ways. It goes without saying that they are extremely creative, and know how to think like designers in everything they do. They are artistic, innovative and imaginative as well. Here are some other areas I’ll highlight that designers excel at, all of which will help your bottom line and assure your next project is an incredible success.

Designers know how to research.

Even if you know exactly what you want, a good designer will still do their homework to assure you are getting the best possible creative solution. Designers are naturally inquisitive, that’s why they got into the profession to begin with; they wanted to know why and how things worked so they could then create something new themselves. Research is a part of every project. It can be informal or formal depending on the project needs. Designers are trained to find answers utilizing a variety of means from store surveys, guest interviews, scientific research, trend research, among others. From all that information the designer can craft reports, trend boards, and presentations to assure clients are making informed design decisions. Many of the clients we work with hire us to solely for research services.

Designers provide comprehensive solutions.

Design isn’t done in a vacuum. It’s not drawing something pretty then walking away. A good designer will not only design something that is beautiful and functional, the solution will executable and work with the vast majority of end users. Retail design requires many considerations from manufacturing to installation; from how guests interact with the solution to how your brand is perceived in the marketplace. We even consider what happens at the end of life for whatever we’ve designed. Throughout the process and once a design is complete the designer can provide you with realistic computer renderings in case you need to go sell your solution. When it comes time for manufacturing, they can provide the specs necessary to turn your dream into reality. You may have thought of everything but when this much is on the line, hiring a designer more than pays for itself by way of comprehensive solutions.

They know how to get things done.

Once the creative solution is complete and the specs are done, the designer can help your team during the production process. They can help you get and evaluate production quotes and oversee production to assure everything is being made to your specifications. The designer is also valuable for answering questions from the various entities involved in making and executing your retail solution. If a problem arises, the designer can often come up with a solution on the spot so your project avoids costly delays.

Designers are great mediators.

Designers, especially industrial designers, tend to be the one common touch point between the client, sales, marketing, manufacturing, sourcing…on and on. Virtually everyone in the process works with the design team. And whether you like it or not, everyone basically has their own interests at heart, at least at a low-level. The designer is a natural-born mediator that is able to take complex situations and craft solutions that pretty much make everyone happy. Designers are extraordinary communicators, and salesmen, who can work with various parties to reach a consensus. It goes without saying that designers are excellent at managing projects as well; making sure everything goes off without a hitch. Given the opportunity, I feel this is probably the one area where clients can benefit the most from hiring a designer. They are professional problem solvers, and that goes for more than just the task at hand.

Designers are focused on the solution.

A good designer does what is right for your brand, organization and the world. An independent design consultant makes design and material decisions based on research and the needs of everyone involved; even beyond the scope of what the client has outlined. Good design is holistic and well thought out. You may be hesitant to pay for design, or you may be getting “free” design from your vendors. Consider pushing the “competition” portion of your project downstream to allow the focus to be on your needs, and you gain a valuable team asset, the designer, in the process. An independent designer isn’t worried about whether he or she will get a purchase order or something can be made in-house. They are focused on creating delightful solutions that are manufacture-able and executable at retail to the benefit of brand, retailer, consumer and world.

There are other ways a retail designer can help with your project; the ones I outlined here are just a few. Whether you are an independent retailer, a consumer product brand or a larger retailer, considering talking to a designer for your next project. I guarantee you that the value they bring will far outweigh the cost.

If you are interested in learning more about what our team can do to help with your next retail project, contact me at chris@chrisweiganddesign.com or by phone at (330) 858-8926.

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Chris Weigand 

President, Chris Weigand Design

Peninsula, Ohio

We are a full service design consultancy specializing in retail design solutions for independent and chain retailers. We provided clients with research, design, sourcing and  project management services that assure they are getting world class solutions that delight their guests and enhance their brand in the marketplace.